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Local Attractions (2014)

APH 2014 Annual Conference:  Believe It . . . Achieve It!

St. Louisans pride themselves on the hometown atmosphere of their bustling metropolis. Located at the crossroads of the nation, St. Louis is a mosaic of nationalities, ethnic groups, religions, languages, and more.

Show Me St. Louis Celebration Tour Highlights

3:00 – 7:00 pm, Saturday, October 25, 2014
Image of 250th celebration of St. Louis
St. Louis celebrates 250 years
Photo credit: Peggy Greenwood
Image of Dred and Harriet Scott
This moving statue of Dred and Harriet Scott stands
at the steps of the Old Courthouse, where they sued
for thir freedom from slavery in 1846. Created by
sculptor Harry Weber, it was unveiled June 2013.
Photo credit: Donna Sullivan Thompson,
All rights reserved

Conference attendees will be treated to a special tour sponsored by APH.

The Missouri History Museum, our first stop on the APH tour, will feature an exhibit titled 250 in 250, celebrating the city's 250th birthday. The museum islocated in the historic Jefferson Memorial at Forest Park.

No tour of St. Louis would be complete without a visit to the Gateway Arch. Visit the Arch or meander through the underground Museum of Westward Expansion. Within walking distance are the Old Cathedral (1841) and the Old Courthouse (1828) with its magnificent statue of Dred and Harriet Scott. Just east of the Arch grounds is The Landing, where the city's historic roots are celebrated in refurbished warehouses serving as restaurants, nightclubs, and jazz halls.

Site of the 1904 World's Fair, Forest Park is home to The Muny, the St. Louis Zoo, St. Louis Art Museum, Steinberg Ice Skating Rink, the St. Louis Science Center, the Jewel Box, and acres of lakes and open fields. Directly across Lindell Boulevard, several mansions built to house the World's Fair dignitaries still stand. Enjoy a great photo op at Grand Basin when our tour buses stop on the way back to our hotel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Thanks to the St. Louis Convention & Visitors Commission for providing the photos above.

Other Points of Interest

Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts
Featuring nearly fifty works of art including pieces by Picasso, Matisse, Sargent, Cezanne, and others.

Citygarden

An urban oasis featuring imaginative uses of water, stone, and lush plantings, with two dozen incredible sculptures scattered throughout the rich landscape in the shadow of the Gateway Arch.

St. Louis Zoo

A world-renowned animal research and education facility with free admission.

Soulard Neighborhood

The historic brick streets and brick townhouses in this area reflect the influence of the French settlers. The Soulard Farmers Market, opened in 1779, is the oldest open-air market in continuous existence in the United States.

The Hill

Settled by immigrants from northern Italy, The Hill is a colorful neighborhood where even fire hydrants are painted green, white, and red, and the premier location for those who savor authentic Italian food. The courage and dignity of this population is memorialized in a statue at St. Ambrose Catholic Church.

Missouri Botanical Garden

This 79-acre oasis is one of the top botanical gardens and research institutions in the world and a magnet for St. Louisans as well as tourists. Philanthropist Henry Shaw founded it in 1859 and gave it to the city. Be sure to stroll around the 14-acre Japanese Garden, Seiwa-en —a "garden of pure, clear harmony and peace." Open daily 9:00 am - 5:00 pm. Admission $8.

The National Personnel Records Center

Located about 40 minutes from our hotel, this facility is the repository of millions of military personnel, health, and medical records of discharged and deceased U.S. veterans of all services during the 20th century. It is open weekdays 7:30 am - 3:45 pm. It is a secure facility and visits must be scheduled at least a month in advance.

Learn More About St. Louis

So much to do . . . so little time! Plan now to spend extra time before or after the conference to explore the city and join the celebration as St. Louis honors its 250 years of American history.